Revue du Village des Anges – But why Tho? A community of geeks

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Doctor Who is a science fiction series created by the BBC. Village of the Angels is the fourth episode of season 13. The current screenwriter and executive producer is Chris Chibnall, who co-wrote this episode with Maxine Alderton. The Doctor is played by Jodie whittaker, with Mandip Gil and John Bishop acting as his companions.

Time was torn apart by Flux, set ablaze by a being from the beginning of the universe. Now things are not where or when they should be. The cosmos is shrinking and the races are fighting over what is left. A young woman searches for her life partner and the father of her child, roaming shattered galaxies. Vinder, his partner, unexpectedly got involved with the Doctor. Protecting his friends, the Time Lord has caused a temporal storm, locking the four in their memories. Yaz found herself stalked by a weeping angel. But after the adventure and in the perceived safety of the TARDIS, the Angel was still there. And this time at the controls of the Time Machine. The Angels have the TARDIS.

Led by the angels, The Doctor, Dan, and Yaz land in a small town in Devon in the 1960s. Immediately, things seem to take a turn for the worse as a young girl is missing. While Dan and Yax help find the child, the Doctor follows mysterious readings in a large house in the village. There’s a psychologist and a woman in there, Claire. The Doctor and the public have seen her before, at different times. And the angels want her. On one of the last remaining places in the universe, Bel finds refuge.

This episode returns this series to one of its most essential genres: horror. But within one episode, Chibnall experiments and interacts with various interpretations of the form. There is a stillness and an expectation that accompanies the weeping angels that cause the viewer to look at their screen. Part of what makes them terrifying is their lack of movement. But there is also an element of folk horror in Village of the Angels as something is wrong within the quiet community. Even within the angels themselves there is a mystery. In each episode several new questions are asked that change everything about Doctor Who. Finally, there is a scientific element, Stone Tape to horror.

The plot is perfectly paced and structured. He walks slowly, keeping everyone spellbound. There is a feeling of being trapped, unable to escape this powerful threat. At no point do you think there is a way out, and the ending is one of the most breathtaking that Doctor Who has never seen. The Angels are perfectly used, absolutely relentless in their cruelty.

The characters are phenomenal in this series, and this chapter adds more to the mix. One of the most endearing and intriguing storylines on the show has been Claire and the Angels. A figure appearing across time and space, followed by a monster that thrills everyone. Annabel scholey is great as a subject of the horror story, but also as a person with a plethora of twists and turns. Just when the audience thinks they’ve got it, Chibnall pulls the rug down. Additionally, Professor Jericho begins his appearance in this episode by posing as the irritating thorn on the Doctor’s side. As she barges in, Jericho questions her every decision. At the end of this chapter, Kevin mcnally the public really cares about him. And young Poppy Polvinick delivers a spooky performance that really delves into this popular horror story.

Thank you to both the visuals and effects team for their incredible work in this episode. Directed by Jamie Magnus Stone, the slow burning fears are perfectly offset by methodical and fluid camera movements. There is a map at the start of Angels Village which can be considered one of the coolest in Doctor Who the story. Stone takes what the audience can expect and blows it out of the water in this scene. When CGI is needed, it looks beautiful and clean. The expanse of space is always magnificent and some breathtaking events are created beautifully.

Village of the Angels is a haunting episode. Inspired by some of the most iconic films of recent years, Doctor Who try popular horror with its own twist. There are several storylines featured here, all of which are compelling and seek to claim the most important one. It’s a quiet chapter, seeking to disrupt instead of panic. The concept of a different set of classic villains in each episode fills audiences with excitement as to who we’ll see next. And having that story going that wraps up a whole story is much more of Chibnall’s style, leading to a totally fantastic experience.

Doctor Who Village of the Angels is available on BBC iPlayer in the UK and on BBC America.

Doctor Who “Village des Anges”

9/10

TL; DR

Village of the Angels is a haunting episode. Inspired by some of the most iconic films of recent years, Doctor Who try popular horror with its own twist. There are several storylines featured here, all of which are compelling and seek to claim the most important one. It’s a quiet chapter, seeking to disrupt instead of panic.


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